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6th January 2014

Photo with 408 notes

Costuming in The Great Gatsby (2013): Not What You Might Think

There are two genres of historical film costuming: the accurate and the artistic. To judge either type by the other’s standards results in dissatisfaction - very accurate costumes that are truly representative of their era will frequently be unattractive or awkward to a modern eye, while very stylized costumes can frustrate a viewer who was hoping to see lavish reproductions for a particular era. But both options have equal advantages: with the latitude to use modern influences, a costume designer can speak more clearly to a modern audience, and with more strict standards of authenticity they can give an impression that the characters have stepped directly out of the past. While you can criticize an artistically costumed movie for inaccuracy or an accuracy-focused production for being odd-looking or for wasting too much time on details, to concentrate entirely on those qualities is to ignore a full picture of what was attempted.

So I wrote a thing during my post-GdM rest time about TGG. It’s maybe less of an analysis of the costumes than it is a defense of the costuming (which I’ve pretty much only seen reviewed in a negative light) with a bonus attack on the popular Roaring Twenties stereotype, so if you have any questions about specific costumes or what have you I’d be happy to take them!

Costuming in The Great Gatsby (2013): Not What You Might Think

There are two genres of historical film costuming: the accurate and the artistic. To judge either type by the other’s standards results in dissatisfaction - very accurate costumes that are truly representative of their era will frequently be unattractive or awkward to a modern eye, while very stylized costumes can frustrate a viewer who was hoping to see lavish reproductions for a particular era. But both options have equal advantages: with the latitude to use modern influences, a costume designer can speak more clearly to a modern audience, and with more strict standards of authenticity they can give an impression that the characters have stepped directly out of the past. While you can criticize an artistically costumed movie for inaccuracy or an accuracy-focused production for being odd-looking or for wasting too much time on details, to concentrate entirely on those qualities is to ignore a full picture of what was attempted.

So I wrote a thing during my post-GdM rest time about TGG. It’s maybe less of an analysis of the costumes than it is a defense of the costuming (which I’ve pretty much only seen reviewed in a negative light) with a bonus attack on the popular Roaring Twenties stereotype, so if you have any questions about specific costumes or what have you I’d be happy to take them!

Tagged: 1920sthe great gatsbyflappersflapperfashion historyreview20th Century

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