What it says on the tin. Also see me at ItMeansApricot, my personal Tumblr, and DressatDownton.

All of the captions in my posts are my own work, unless otherwise noted. So please reblog, don't repost.

6th April 2011

Photo with 2 notes

Robe à la française, ca. 1760; chiné silk
Victoria & Albert Museum T.16&A-1961; unknown donor
During the eighteenth century, Europeans admired the look of the “exotic” ikat.  Seeking to imitate it, they used wood-block printing to put a pattern on the warp threads before weaving.  This created an even wavier pattern on the finished fabric.  Chiné silk was extremely expensive, but also extremely fashionable.

Robe à la française, ca. 1760; chiné silk

Victoria & Albert Museum T.16&A-1961; unknown donor

During the eighteenth century, Europeans admired the look of the “exotic” ikat.  Seeking to imitate it, they used wood-block printing to put a pattern on the warp threads before weaving.  This created an even wavier pattern on the finished fabric.  Chiné silk was extremely expensive, but also extremely fashionable.

Tagged: Robe à la Française18th Centuryextanthistorical fashion

Source: collections.vam.ac.uk

  1. mimic-of-modes posted this