What it says on the tin. Also see me at ItMeansApricot, my personal Tumblr, and DressatDownton.

All of the captions in my posts are my own work, unless otherwise noted. So please reblog, don't repost.

11th January 2011

Photo with 18 notes

Antoine-Laurent Lavoisier and His Wife, Jacques-Louis David, 1788
Metropolitan Museum of Art, 1977.10, purchased with Mr. and Mrs. Charles Wrightsman Gift, in honor of Everett Fahy
 
In this painting, Mme Lavoisier wears the radical new costume of the 1780s: the gaulle (or chemise gown, or chemise á la reine …) which debuted in a portrait of Marie Antoinette by Vigée-le Brun.  In its earliest incarnation, it took the form of two layers of fine muslin in a tube with loose sleeves; there would be a drawstring around the neckline (sometimes this drawstring would be several inches below the top edge of the double layer of muslin, creating a gathered ruffle at the neck) and another at the end of the sleeve.  The waist would be gathered in with a colored silk sash.  This style was intended to imitate ancient draperies, and was worn in extremely casual situations, but the gown developed more structured and heavier variants in the 1790s, and eventually resulted in the high-waisted gowns on the early 19th century.
As with women’s dress, fashionable men’s clothes of the time were plain, deliberately opposing the lavish silk suits of the aristocracy.  M Lavoisier’s black suit marks him as a political liberal.

Antoine-Laurent Lavoisier and His Wife, Jacques-Louis David, 1788

Metropolitan Museum of Art, 1977.10, purchased with Mr. and Mrs. Charles Wrightsman Gift, in honor of Everett Fahy

 

In this painting, Mme Lavoisier wears the radical new costume of the 1780s: the gaulle (or chemise gown, or chemise á la reine …) which debuted in a portrait of Marie Antoinette by Vigée-le Brun.  In its earliest incarnation, it took the form of two layers of fine muslin in a tube with loose sleeves; there would be a drawstring around the neckline (sometimes this drawstring would be several inches below the top edge of the double layer of muslin, creating a gathered ruffle at the neck) and another at the end of the sleeve.  The waist would be gathered in with a colored silk sash.  This style was intended to imitate ancient draperies, and was worn in extremely casual situations, but the gown developed more structured and heavier variants in the 1790s, and eventually resulted in the high-waisted gowns on the early 19th century.


As with women’s dress, fashionable men’s clothes of the time were plain, deliberately opposing the lavish silk suits of the aristocracy.  M Lavoisier’s black suit marks him as a political liberal.

Tagged: 18th centuryhistorical fashionchemise gownlavoisierart history

Source: metmuseum.org

  1. vriscous reblogged this from serketstalker
  2. serketstalker reblogged this from mimic-of-modes
  3. mrspm reblogged this from khymeia
  4. khymeia reblogged this from mimic-of-modes
  5. shapesofglory reblogged this from mimic-of-modes
  6. penitenttrawler reblogged this from historyofeurope
  7. shimaks reblogged this from historyofeurope
  8. myrna-coy reblogged this from mimic-of-modes
  9. sonistuff reblogged this from jack-the-ripper
  10. s-q-a-b reblogged this from historyofeurope and added:
    Lavoisier was an awesome French aristocrat/gov bureaucrat/scientist/inventor/sort-of-revolutionary, and his wife, who he...
  11. historyofeurope reblogged this from mimic-of-modes
  12. jack-the-ripper reblogged this from mimic-of-modes
  13. mimic-of-modes posted this