What it says on the tin. Also see me at ItMeansApricot, my personal Tumblr, and DressatDownton.

All of the captions in my posts are my own work, unless otherwise noted. So please reblog, don't repost.

23rd April 2014

Photo with 3 notes

The second, dressed in a gown of apple green Pekin, has her hair done all in large curls, of which four, placed in a two rows, hang on each side of her chest. On the curls is applied a pouf à la Virginie, in sulfur-colored gauze with violet stripes. This pouf is trimmed with a very-wide pink ribbon with a black selvage, forming a large bow in front, and a large bow in the back. This ribbon is entwined with a garland of artificial flowers, heliotrope, rose, and lilac, shaded. On the left of the pouf rise three large plumes, green mixed with pink, pink mixed with green, and black mixed with blue. - Cabinet des Modes, 23e Cahier, 2e Figure

The second, dressed in a gown of apple green Pekin, has her hair done all in large curls, of which four, placed in a two rows, hang on each side of her chest. On the curls is applied a pouf à la Virginie, in sulfur-colored gauze with violet stripes. This pouf is trimmed with a very-wide pink ribbon with a black selvage, forming a large bow in front, and a large bow in the back. This ribbon is entwined with a garland of artificial flowers, heliotrope, rose, and lilac, shaded. On the left of the pouf rise three large plumes, green mixed with pink, pink mixed with green, and black mixed with blue. - Cabinet des Modes, 23e Cahier, 2e Figure

Tagged: 18th Centuryhatsfashion historyfashion platehistorical fashion1780scabinet des modes

22nd April 2014

Photo with 2 notes

The fashion for children of both sexes is to wear men’s redingotes, in wool, with two collars, and with sleeves à la Marinière, as can be seen in the Ist PLATE. The little Boy wears a violet one over the coat of his matelot, made of silk, canary’s tail color; and the little Girl wears one of Sky blue, over a little pink corset, and a white muslin petticoat, which covers one of blue Pekin. Both have hair cut à la Jockei, which falls freely; both wear a felt hat, either black or a varied color, with plumes, or without plumes, with ribbons wrapping it, and bows in the back and front, or without ribbons and bows; both have shoes with bows on top; both have colerettes, or cravats; both have a belt; or both do not wear them. - Cabinet des Modes, 23e Cahier, 1ere Figure

The fashion for children of both sexes is to wear men’s redingotes, in wool, with two collars, and with sleeves à la Marinière, as can be seen in the Ist PLATE. The little Boy wears a violet one over the coat of his matelot, made of silk, canary’s tail color; and the little Girl wears one of Sky blue, over a little pink corset, and a white muslin petticoat, which covers one of blue Pekin. Both have hair cut à la Jockei, which falls freely; both wear a felt hat, either black or a varied color, with plumes, or without plumes, with ribbons wrapping it, and bows in the back and front, or without ribbons and bows; both have shoes with bows on top; both have colerettes, or cravats; both have a belt; or both do not wear them. - Cabinet des Modes, 23e Cahier, 1ere Figure

Tagged: 18th Centurychildrenfashion historyfashion platehistorical fashion1780scabinet des modes

22nd April 2014

Photoset reblogged from Just Somewhere Different Now with 10,226 notes

apiroscsizmak:

reapergrellsutcliff:

Fashions of the Future as Imagined in 1893

Illustrations from “Future Dictates of Fashion” by W. Cade Gall that was published in the January 1893 issue of The Strand magazine.

Our predecessors expected so much of us. Look at how we failed them.

What I find interesting about this is that they were predicting we’d stay really into historicism (which the 19th century was almost entirely about) - using styles from the past. And a lot of the 20th century was about taking inspiration from historic fashion, it’s just that the designers didn’t go as far back as they thought, we have no doublets and breeches. The 1910s - influenced by the 1800s-1810s. The 1940s and 1950s - repeating the 1850s and 1860s (and late 1910s) wide skirts. The 1970s’ bowler hats and checks and frilly shirts, the new Romantics. A lot of women’s clothes in the 1980s are borderline indistinguishable from 1940s suits and dresses. For the past half-decade or so I’ve seen a ton of things in Vogue and even everyday clothing retailers that look ripped from the 1930s. 

And 1978 guy is wearing some reasonably accurate flares. (Yes, I know they’re really the turn-downs on his boots.)

Tagged: ramblingscience fiction

Source: reapergrellsutcliff

21st April 2014

Photo with 14 notes

1. A Woman dressed in a pink caraco. Her neck is covered with a gauze kerchiefen chemise, with two large ordinary collars. Her hair is done all in curls, and she wears on her head a pouf à la Chinoise, of linen-gauze. This pouf is wrapped with a diadême* with a black and nakara ground. It is trimmed with artificial chinese flowers, in the middle of which glow yellow pistils. These flowers form a garland fastened on the left side. The pouf is furthermore decorated with an apple green ribbon, with fluffy, lilac selvages. Behind the pouf hangs a thick puff of white linen-gauze. - Cabinet des Modes, 22e Cahier, 3e Figure

1. A Woman dressed in a pink caraco. Her neck is covered with a gauze kerchiefen chemise, with two large ordinary collars. Her hair is done all in curls, and she wears on her head a pouf à la Chinoise, of linen-gauze. This pouf is wrapped with a diadême* with a black and nakara ground. It is trimmed with artificial chinese flowers, in the middle of which glow yellow pistils. These flowers form a garland fastened on the left side. The pouf is furthermore decorated with an apple green ribbon, with fluffy, lilac selvages. Behind the pouf hangs a thick puff of white linen-gauze. - Cabinet des Modes, 22e Cahier, 3e Figure

Tagged: 18th Centuryfashion historyfashion platehistorical fashionhats1780scabinet des modes

17th April 2014

Photo with 2 notes

The young Man wears under his coat a gilet of canary’s tail colored silk, embroidered in green silk.His breeches are of drap de soie, also canary’s tail color.His stockings are silk, with white and apple-green stripes.His shoe buckles are silver, oval, with four flat rings on top, and fastened with little bars. His garter buckles are also silver, in a long oval.In his watch-pockets, in the front, he carries two watches. From one hangs a simple black cord, with a very-large key; from the other a gold chain, decorated with charms. - Cabinet des Modes, 22e Cahier, 2e Figure

The young Man wears under his coat a gilet of canary’s tail colored silk, embroidered in green silk.

His breeches are of drap de soie, also canary’s tail color.

His stockings are silk, with white and apple-green stripes.


His shoe buckles are silver, oval, with four flat rings on top, and fastened with little bars. His garter buckles are also silver, in a long oval.

In his watch-pockets, in the front, he carries two watches. From one hangs a simple black cord, with a very-large key; from the other a gold chain, decorated with charms. - Cabinet des Modes, 22e Cahier, 2e Figure

Tagged: 18th Centuryfashion historyfashion platehistorical fashiongentlemen1780scabinet des modes

16th April 2014

Photo with 11 notes

Caracos à l’Innocence reconnu or à la Cauchoise, will teach for a thousand years that in 1786, an unhappy Cook named Marie-Françoise-Victoire Salmon, who was seen twice led to the stake to be burned as guilty of the most execrable poisoning, and who, twice, was snatched from the hands of her executioners through the vigorous and steadfast virtue of M. Cauchois, her Lawyer, was finally declared innocent by the Parlement of Paris. … Under the caraco, the Woman wears a little corset, or gilet, if one likes, of white Pekin.
Her petticoat is of apple green Pekin; it is trimmed with a volant of matching fabric, with a reversed head. - Cabinet des Modes, 22e Cahier, 1ere Figure

Caracos à l’Innocence reconnu or à la Cauchoise, will teach for a thousand years that in 1786, an unhappy Cook named Marie-Françoise-Victoire Salmon, who was seen twice led to the stake to be burned as guilty of the most execrable poisoning, and who, twice, was snatched from the hands of her executioners through the vigorous and steadfast virtue of M. Cauchois, her Lawyer, was finally declared innocent by the Parlement of Paris. … Under the caraco, the Woman wears a little corset, or gilet, if one likes, of white Pekin.


Her petticoat is of apple green Pekin; it is trimmed with a volant of matching fabric, with a reversed head. - Cabinet des Modes, 22e Cahier, 1ere Figure

Tagged: 18th Centuryfashion historyfashion platehistorical fashioncaraco1780scabinet des modes

16th April 2014

Photoset reblogged from I Don't Wanna with 75,113 notes

polkadotprincessmondo:

mimic-of-modes:

I have no idea what the context of this is, but it’s not really true. There’s no 100% agreement in etiquette books and magazines on the subject - here’s a page from a whole book on gender and kids and stuff, with an example of Ladies’ Home Journal and Louisa May Alcott being definite but opposed. Sometimes people recommended pink for boys, sometimes for girls, sometimes just based it on complexion.

I don’t know about the Hitler connection, but, to my knowledge, the idea of pink for girls and blue for boys was really cemented in the 50s when someone somewhere decided that made sense and people spent a buttload of money on related merchandise. Before that, because pink was associated with red, a lot of people considered it a more masculine color. Either way, I can only laugh when people insist that girls just prefer pink and boys just prefer blue and try to come up with evopsych bullshit to explain something that’s really only been a thing anyone was really rigid about for about 60 years.

theyorkist:

I also strongly doubt that pink became the default girl colour because of the Nazis using it to identify homosexuals. As much as it is pleasing to assume that the sinister world of gendering infants has an even more sinister background, I honestly think that it had more to do with the marketing machine that sprang up around the middle of the twentieth century. Bear in mind that clothing for the under fives wasn’t really gendered at all until around the turn of the twentieth century. Making it so that there were gender specific clothes, toys, even books meant that parents had fewer options in handing them down from one child to the next and so they had to buy twice the amount of items. Marketing genius. 

Tagged: theyorkistpolkadotprincess20th Century

Source: sueishappy

15th April 2014

Photoset reblogged from Crash The Fandom with 75,113 notes

I have no idea what the context of this is, but it’s not really true. There’s no 100% agreement in etiquette books and magazines on the subject - here’s a page from a whole book on gender and kids and stuff, with an example of Ladies’ Home Journal and Louisa May Alcott being definite but opposed. Sometimes people recommended pink for boys, sometimes for girls, sometimes just based it on complexion.

Tagged: infantschildren

Source: sueishappy

15th April 2014

Photo with 2 notes

A crystal Sugar bowl, mounted in silver, set on a platter of the same metal, held on four animal feet, and having a handle on each side. This Sugar bowl is in the shape of a slightly rounded vase; it has two handles; it is decorated with garlands of flowers, tied with tassels. - Cabinet des Modes, 21e Cahier, 3e Figure

A crystal Sugar bowl, mounted in silver, set on a platter of the same metal, held on four animal feet, and having a handle on each side. This Sugar bowl is in the shape of a slightly rounded vase; it has two handles; it is decorated with garlands of flowers, tied with tassels. - Cabinet des Modes, 21e Cahier, 3e Figure

Tagged: 18th Century1780sdecorative artscabinet des modes

14th April 2014

Photo with 42 notes

The coats which seem to be in fashion this autumn, are coats in puce wool. The Man drawn in this Plate wears one of this color. The lining of his coat is a matching color. To all the edges is attached a little white ribbon, forming the piping. - Cabinet des Modes, 21e Cahier, 2e Figure

The coats which seem to be in fashion this autumn, are coats in puce wool. The Man drawn in this Plate wears one of this color. The lining of his coat is a matching color. To all the edges is attached a little white ribbon, forming the piping. - Cabinet des Modes, 21e Cahier, 2e Figure

Tagged: 18th Centuryfashion historyfashion platehistorical fashiongentlemen1780scabinet des modes