What it says on the tin. Also see me at ItMeansApricot, my personal Tumblr, and DressatDownton.

All of the captions in my posts are my own work, unless otherwise noted. So please reblog, don't repost.

17th April 2014

Photo with 2 notes

The young Man wears under his coat a gilet of canary’s tail colored silk, embroidered in green silk.His breeches are of drap de soie, also canary’s tail color.His stockings are silk, with white and apple-green stripes.His shoe buckles are silver, oval, with four flat rings on top, and fastened with little bars. His garter buckles are also silver, in a long oval.In his watch-pockets, in the front, he carries two watches. From one hangs a simple black cord, with a very-large key; from the other a gold chain, decorated with charms. - Cabinet des Modes, 22e Cahier, 2e Figure

The young Man wears under his coat a gilet of canary’s tail colored silk, embroidered in green silk.

His breeches are of drap de soie, also canary’s tail color.

His stockings are silk, with white and apple-green stripes.


His shoe buckles are silver, oval, with four flat rings on top, and fastened with little bars. His garter buckles are also silver, in a long oval.

In his watch-pockets, in the front, he carries two watches. From one hangs a simple black cord, with a very-large key; from the other a gold chain, decorated with charms. - Cabinet des Modes, 22e Cahier, 2e Figure

Tagged: 18th Centuryfashion historyfashion platehistorical fashiongentlemen1780scabinet des modes

16th April 2014

Photo with 11 notes

Caracos à l’Innocence reconnu or à la Cauchoise, will teach for a thousand years that in 1786, an unhappy Cook named Marie-Françoise-Victoire Salmon, who was seen twice led to the stake to be burned as guilty of the most execrable poisoning, and who, twice, was snatched from the hands of her executioners through the vigorous and steadfast virtue of M. Cauchois, her Lawyer, was finally declared innocent by the Parlement of Paris. … Under the caraco, the Woman wears a little corset, or gilet, if one likes, of white Pekin.
Her petticoat is of apple green Pekin; it is trimmed with a volant of matching fabric, with a reversed head. - Cabinet des Modes, 22e Cahier, 1ere Figure

Caracos à l’Innocence reconnu or à la Cauchoise, will teach for a thousand years that in 1786, an unhappy Cook named Marie-Françoise-Victoire Salmon, who was seen twice led to the stake to be burned as guilty of the most execrable poisoning, and who, twice, was snatched from the hands of her executioners through the vigorous and steadfast virtue of M. Cauchois, her Lawyer, was finally declared innocent by the Parlement of Paris. … Under the caraco, the Woman wears a little corset, or gilet, if one likes, of white Pekin.


Her petticoat is of apple green Pekin; it is trimmed with a volant of matching fabric, with a reversed head. - Cabinet des Modes, 22e Cahier, 1ere Figure

Tagged: 18th Centuryfashion historyfashion platehistorical fashioncaraco1780scabinet des modes

16th April 2014

Photoset reblogged from I Don't Wanna with 69,411 notes

polkadotprincessmondo:

mimic-of-modes:

I have no idea what the context of this is, but it’s not really true. There’s no 100% agreement in etiquette books and magazines on the subject - here’s a page from a whole book on gender and kids and stuff, with an example of Ladies’ Home Journal and Louisa May Alcott being definite but opposed. Sometimes people recommended pink for boys, sometimes for girls, sometimes just based it on complexion.

I don’t know about the Hitler connection, but, to my knowledge, the idea of pink for girls and blue for boys was really cemented in the 50s when someone somewhere decided that made sense and people spent a buttload of money on related merchandise. Before that, because pink was associated with red, a lot of people considered it a more masculine color. Either way, I can only laugh when people insist that girls just prefer pink and boys just prefer blue and try to come up with evopsych bullshit to explain something that’s really only been a thing anyone was really rigid about for about 60 years.

theyorkist:

I also strongly doubt that pink became the default girl colour because of the Nazis using it to identify homosexuals. As much as it is pleasing to assume that the sinister world of gendering infants has an even more sinister background, I honestly think that it had more to do with the marketing machine that sprang up around the middle of the twentieth century. Bear in mind that clothing for the under fives wasn’t really gendered at all until around the turn of the twentieth century. Making it so that there were gender specific clothes, toys, even books meant that parents had fewer options in handing them down from one child to the next and so they had to buy twice the amount of items. Marketing genius. 

Tagged: theyorkistpolkadotprincess20th Century

Source: sueishappy

15th April 2014

Photoset reblogged from Crash The Fandom with 69,411 notes

I have no idea what the context of this is, but it’s not really true. There’s no 100% agreement in etiquette books and magazines on the subject - here’s a page from a whole book on gender and kids and stuff, with an example of Ladies’ Home Journal and Louisa May Alcott being definite but opposed. Sometimes people recommended pink for boys, sometimes for girls, sometimes just based it on complexion.

Tagged: infantschildren

Source: sueishappy

15th April 2014

Photo with 2 notes

A crystal Sugar bowl, mounted in silver, set on a platter of the same metal, held on four animal feet, and having a handle on each side. This Sugar bowl is in the shape of a slightly rounded vase; it has two handles; it is decorated with garlands of flowers, tied with tassels. - Cabinet des Modes, 21e Cahier, 3e Figure

A crystal Sugar bowl, mounted in silver, set on a platter of the same metal, held on four animal feet, and having a handle on each side. This Sugar bowl is in the shape of a slightly rounded vase; it has two handles; it is decorated with garlands of flowers, tied with tassels. - Cabinet des Modes, 21e Cahier, 3e Figure

Tagged: 18th Century1780sdecorative artscabinet des modes

14th April 2014

Photo with 43 notes

The coats which seem to be in fashion this autumn, are coats in puce wool. The Man drawn in this Plate wears one of this color. The lining of his coat is a matching color. To all the edges is attached a little white ribbon, forming the piping. - Cabinet des Modes, 21e Cahier, 2e Figure

The coats which seem to be in fashion this autumn, are coats in puce wool. The Man drawn in this Plate wears one of this color. The lining of his coat is a matching color. To all the edges is attached a little white ribbon, forming the piping. - Cabinet des Modes, 21e Cahier, 2e Figure

Tagged: 18th Centuryfashion historyfashion platehistorical fashiongentlemen1780scabinet des modes

11th April 2014

Photo with 4 notes

The Lady represented in the Ist PLATE is ready to ride. She is dressed in a coat (a) of puce Pekin, with three collars, with slightly long basques, and with sleeves à la Marinière. The fronts of the coat , the pockets and sleeves à la Marinière, are trimmed with little flat buttons of white ivory. There are ten of them on each side of the fronts, three on the sleeves, and five on each pocket. - Cabinet des Modes, 21e Cahier, 1ere Figure

The Lady represented in the Ist PLATE is ready to ride. She is dressed in a coat (a) of puce Pekin, with three collars, with slightly long basques, and with sleeves à la Marinière. The fronts of the coat , the pockets and sleeves à la Marinière, are trimmed with little flat buttons of white ivory. There are ten of them on each side of the fronts, three on the sleeves, and five on each pocket. - Cabinet des Modes, 21e Cahier, 1ere Figure

Tagged: 18th Centuryfashion historyfashion platehistorical fashionriding habit1780scabinet des modes

10th April 2014

Photo with 4 notes

This Lady is dressed in a bodice of pink taffeta, to which is attached a very-long train of the same taffeta.Her petticoat is an apple green taffeta. It is very-wide, worn on each side over rather wide hoops. The stomacher, under the bodice, is made of pink ribbons, tied in bows. The cuffs of the sleeves and the bottom of the petticoat are trimmed with white gauze. - Cabinet des Modes, 20e Cahier, 3e Figure

This Lady is dressed in a bodice of pink taffeta, to which is attached a very-long train of the same taffeta.

Her petticoat is an apple green taffeta. It is very-wide, worn on each side over rather wide hoops. The stomacher, under the bodice, is made of pink ribbons, tied in bows. The cuffs of the sleeves and the bottom of the petticoat are trimmed with white gauze. - Cabinet des Modes, 20e Cahier, 3e Figure

Tagged: 18th Centuryfashion historyfashion platehistorical fashioncourt dress1780scabinet des modes

9th April 2014

Photo with 14 notes

LIKE the Lady drawn in the Ist PLATE, we have thought to represent in this a man in half-mourning. …Black stockings and breeches; gilet of taffeta with wide white and black stripes; grey coat with collar of black velvet; black lining with piping; and striped, bronzed steel buttons. - Cabinet des Modes, 20e Cahier, 2e Figure

LIKE the Lady drawn in the Ist PLATE, we have thought to represent in this a man in half-mourning. …

Black stockings and breeches; gilet of taffeta with wide white and black stripes; grey coat with collar of black velvet; black lining with piping; and striped, bronzed steel buttons. - Cabinet des Modes, 20e Cahier, 2e Figure

Tagged: 18th Centuryfashion historyfashion platehistorical fashiongentlemen1780scabinet des modes

9th April 2014

Photo reblogged from Mrs Bertin's Jewelry Box with 270 notes

omgthatdress:

Unmarried Woman’s Ensemble
Russia, early 19th century
The Hermitage Museum
Donate to the Russian LGBT Network

omgthatdress:

Unmarried Woman’s Ensemble

Russia, early 19th century

The Hermitage Museum

Donate to the Russian LGBT Network

Tagged: non-western

Source: omgthatdress