What it says on the tin. Also see me at ItMeansApricot, my personal Tumblr, and DressatDownton.

All of the captions in my posts are my own work, unless otherwise noted. So please reblog, don't repost.

28th September 2014

Post reblogged from Just Somewhere Different Now with 83,050 notes

birdrhetorics:

wolfwithafoxtail:

People think feminism means that there’s a group of women somewhere that want to take trousers with pockets away from men and give them to women, and give men trousers with fake pockets, while in reality feminism is the general idea that everyone should have trousers with pockets, because pockets are awesome.

Why We Oppose Pockets for Women

Satire by Alice Duer Miller, from 1915 (x)

1. BECAUSE pockets are not a natural right.

2. Because the great majority of women do not want pockets. If they did they would have them.

3. Because whenever women have had pockets they have not used them.

4. Because women are required to carry enough things as it is, without the additional burden of pockets.

5. Because it would make dissension between husband and wife as to whose pockets were to be filled.

6. Because it would destroy man’s chivalry toward woman, if he did not have to carry all her things in his pockets.

7. Because men are men, and women are women. We must not fly in the face of nature.

8. Because pockets have been used by men to carry tobacco, pipes, whiskey flasks, chewing gum and compromising letters. We see no reason to suppose that women would use them more wisely.

Tagged: 1910s20th Centuryfeminism

Source: wolfwithafoxtail

27th September 2014

Photoset reblogged from Ace In The Hole with 1,894 notes

historicroyalpalaces:

A never before seen dress made for and worn by Queen Victoria is now on display in the Victoria Revealed exhibition at Kensington Palace.  The cream silk satin dress, with intricate embroidery, was given to the young Queen in the 1850s by the wife John Gregory Crace.


Find out more about the exhibition: http://bit.ly/1k8l0js

WHY ARE THEY TOUCHING IT AND NOT ME??

Tagged: 1850svictorianquite literally19th Century

Source: historicroyalpalaces

26th September 2014

Photoset reblogged from The Wonderful Wax Automaton with 3,902 notes

enigmarelle:

mimic-of-modes:

enigmarelle:

twostriptechnicolor:

Everyday Fashion, 1939.

(Hm… I shoulda included a girl wearing slacks too…)

I’m glad you didn’t….it would have shown what WWII’s influence did, along with the other vestigial things it planted…like daylight savings time. I am glad to know that there are people on here who post things that don’t follow modernism’s “new norm” stuff. I am so tired of realizing that the way most stuff you see and experience now is because of that war’s influence

I’m not sure if I’m reading you right, but women were actually wearing casual trousers/bifurcated garments before the war.

They were,  but the garments were for activities like bicycling or gymnastics.

Not quite true! They were a big part of loungewear in the later 1920s and 1930s - beach pajamas could technically be worn to play volleyball or ride bicycles (I wouldn’t want to, they’d get caught in the chain most likely) but their main purpose was to sit around in. Hostess pajamas were similar, but sometimes extremely fancy (I’ve seen a pair in gold lamé), and definitely not meant for recreation. Some apparently even wore them to the theater or to tea with friends.

Tagged: 1930s

Source: twostriptechnicolor

26th September 2014

Photo reblogged from Fashion and Costume History with 341 notes

hotel-haute-societe:

Joan Marion Pratt, Marchioness Camden photographed by Bassano, 23 July 1912

hotel-haute-societe:

Joan Marion Pratt, Marchioness Camden photographed by Bassano, 23 July 1912

Tagged: 1910s20th Century

Source: hotel-haute-societe

25th September 2014

Photoset reblogged from The Wonderful Wax Automaton with 3,902 notes

enigmarelle:

twostriptechnicolor:

Everyday Fashion, 1939.

(Hm… I shoulda included a girl wearing slacks too…)

I’m glad you didn’t….it would have shown what WWII’s influence did, along with the other vestigial things it planted…like daylight savings time. I am glad to know that there are people on here who post things that don’t follow modernism’s “new norm” stuff. I am so tired of realizing that the way most stuff you see and experience now is because of that war’s influence

I’m not sure if I’m reading you right, but women were actually wearing casual trousers/bifurcated garments before the war.

Source: twostriptechnicolor

25th September 2014

Video reblogged from Days Gone By with 37 notes

fyeahzeldafitzgerald:

I’m working on the Fitzgerald masterpost and this video is literally the only place I’ve found that has the footage of Zelda walking and Scott and Zelda with Scottie. The only place I could find it was on the wayback machine since youtube deleted it. My husband and one of my friends somehow ripped it off there. So I’m sharing this early (if you find that footage somewhere else then send it to me please).

Here the link to it on the wayback machine.

Tagged: 1920s20th Century

Source: fyeahzeldafitzgerald

25th September 2014

Photo reblogged from Medieval and Early Modern Women with 39 notes

illumanu:

14th century (1338-1344) Flemish - Tournai
Oxford, Bodleian Library
MS. Bodl. 264: Romance of Alexander
fol. 181v
source (at LUNA)

illumanu:

14th century (1338-1344) Flemish - Tournai

Oxford, Bodleian Library

MS. Bodl. 264: Romance of Alexander

fol. 181v

source (at LUNA)

Tagged: medieval14th century

Source: illumanu

25th September 2014

Photo reblogged from the first waltz: a historical photoblog with 52 notes

longliveroyalty:

Miss France Evelyn Maynard, later Daisy Greville the Countess of Warwick. 1883.

longliveroyalty:

Miss France Evelyn Maynard, later Daisy Greville the Countess of Warwick. 1883.

Tagged: 1880s19th Centuryvictorian

Source: longliveroyalty

25th September 2014

Photoset reblogged from Fashion and Costume History with 3,902 notes

twostriptechnicolor:

Everyday Fashion, 1939.

(Hm… I shoulda included a girl wearing slacks too…)

Tagged: 1930s20th Century

Source: twostriptechnicolor

24th September 2014

Photoset reblogged from Nice job breaking it, history. with 429 notes

philamuseum:

More Art Monday: Although sapphires come in a range of colors, deep blue is often most prized. Happy birthday, sapphire babies.

Pendant, late 19th century, America

Winter Chaos, Blizzard,” 1909, Marsden Hartley

Woman’s Dress: Bodice, Overskirt, and Underskirt, c. 1875, French

Chair, designed 1941–42, designed by Jens Risom, made by Knoll

Ring, c. 1950, America

Hydrangeas Spring Song,” 1976, by Alma Thomas

Man’s Dragon Robe (Mang Pao), early 20th century, China

Plate, c. 1825, made by Henshall and Company, decoration after Thomas Birch

Tagged: 1870svictorian19th Centuryamong other things

Source: philamuseum