What it says on the tin. Also see me at ItMeansApricot, my personal Tumblr, and DressatDownton.

All of the captions in my posts are my own work, unless otherwise noted. So please reblog, don't repost.

19th October 2014

Photoset reblogged from My Pompadour Isn't Listening. with 60 notes

edwardian-time-machine:

1912 - 1914 Fashion Plates from Le Gazette du Bon Ton, Pt. 2

Source

Tagged: 1910s20th century

19th October 2014

Photo reblogged from A L' Ancien Regime with 4,009 notes

the-garden-of-delights:

"The Bridal Train" (1933) by Frank Owen Salisbury (1874-1962).

the-garden-of-delights:

"The Bridal Train" (1933) by Frank Owen Salisbury (1874-1962).

Tagged: 1930s20th century

Source: the-garden-of-delights

19th October 2014

Photoset reblogged from Medieval and Early Modern Women with 32 notes

medieval-women:

Bertha of Holland

Born c. 1055 – Died 1093

As the first wife of King Philip I of France, Bertha was queen consort of the Franks from 1072 until 1092. After nine years of childlessness, the royal couple had three children, including Philip’s successor, Louis the Fat.

Philip grew tired of Bertha and repudiated her in 1092 in order to marry the already married Bertrade de Montfort. His reason for this was supposedly because she was too fat, though he himself was too obese to ride a horse.

The second picture shows Phillip and Bertrade marrying whith Bertha locked in a tower above.

Tagged: 11th centurymedievalher face in the tower though

19th October 2014

Photoset with 7 notes

The other day I went to a yard sale I saw advertised in the laundromat window (I saw it as I was walking back from the post office, where I mailed a cover letter and résumé, cross your fingers for me!). I just meant to get a salt shaker and new computer speakers, but there was this kind of industrial-looking old electric machine for $25. I hemmed and hawed for a while because I live with my mother in a very small Victorian house and there is no room for anything else - there is no room for what we already have. I also work 10-15 hours a week and should not be buying anything. But in the end I gave in, figuring I could at least sell it for what I paid somewhere, especially if I could explain more details about the model and history.

I found out that it’s a 1941 Singer 99, and the crinkle (or Godzilla) finish - which I took to mean it was a cheap/bulk industrial model - is actually somewhat rare. It’s seen on models produced during and after the war years, and while it looks like something related to wartime shortages, it isn’t really, although it might have been a marketing scheme: “Buy a rough-looking Singer, you shouldn’t have fancy things right now, there’s a war on!” IDK.

In the afternoon I tried it out and had a lot of tension issues, but this morning Mom and I worked on it, took it apart in a few places, cleaned it some, etc. and it seems to be working very well, as you can see! The light bulb burnt out when I first tried to turn it on, but I have very good eyes so it’s not an issue right now. The motor works, the pedal works, the cord is a little gross in the way that plastics get after decades but still whole. I do still intend to sell it (the crinkle finish seems to be collectible), but I will probably be using it for a while. These cast iron machines hold up very well - someday we’re going to have to fix up our inherited 1871 Singer 12 treadle machine, it needs a couple of parts as well as cleaning, but there are plenty of people today who still do their sewing with a treadle!

Some sites I’ve been using to learn about, run and/or work on the machine:

Singer 99 threading instructions

Crinkle finish

Cleaning and servicing a 66/99

The Vintage Singers Yahoo group

Cleaning a 99k

Restoring a 99k

Singer 66s and 99s

Getting the rassum frassum slide plate back onto the prongs: 1 and 2

Dating a machine via serial number

Identifying a Singer model through questions

Tagged: sewing machineantiquessinger 99wwii

19th October 2014

Photo reblogged from A L' Ancien Regime with 216 notes

mademoisellelapiquante:

Empress Maria Theresa (detail) | Martin van Meytens | 18th century

mademoisellelapiquante:

Empress Maria Theresa (detail) | Martin van Meytens | 18th century

Tagged: 1750sprobably?18th century

Source: mademoisellelapiquante

18th October 2014

Link reblogged from Fashion and Costume History with 7 notes

Charles Frederick Worth, the Empress Eugnie and the invention of Haute-Couture →

costumehistory:

Really nice essay from napoleon.org, complete with a plethora of citations, for anyone who wants to do further reading.

Pictured below: A ball gown of Empress Eugenie designed by Charles Frederick Worth

Ball gown for Empress Eugenie of France, House of Worth, 1865.

Really well written! I encourage everyone to read it.

Although I have to wonder where the idea that Worth (and Eugénie?) hated the hoop skirt/crinoline has come from, or that they conspired together to banish it. For one thing, for people who hated it they both certainly made good use of it! For another, the shape so gradually turned into the elliptical and then the first, larger bustle, which was essentially a hoop skirt until 1874-75ish.

I also question the idea that Worth actually produced a serious change in the way the physical fashion house appeared; I wonder about a lot of the things that are always attributed to him, as I think they tend to rest on his own statements after the fact … I would love to see a critical take on what “haute couture” means apart from the literal meaning, excellent cut, materials, workmanship, etc., such that Worth was able to be said to have invented it, based on an in-depth comparison of the overall state of the fashion system in the 1850s to the 1860s.

It’s not really a problem with this article so much as the way Worth’s contributions to/invention of fashion are generally written about, but there’s always the implication that he was literally the only couturier of note for some time and was in total control. What about Pingat, Felix, Laferrière? What about the others listed in guidebooks as providing nouveautés pour dames prior to Worth’s reign who appear to be men? Why does a guidebook list Worth as being best for mantles, and have good dressmakers (half women, btw) on the next page without him? There are so many questions out there.

Tagged: 19th centuryi'm not trying to be argumentativeI just have a lot of feels about WorthI think he's like Chanel in that he's remembered as more than he was because he was good at selling himselfand because his house went on for such a long timeand we accept it because it's established truth that Worth was the bestI'M SORRYvictorianworth

18th October 2014

Photoset reblogged from We're On Each Other's Team with 80 notes

ephemeral-elegance:

Flower Pot Dress and Cardigan, ca. 1925-26

Paul Poiret

via The Met

Tagged: 1920s20th century

Source: ephemeral-elegance

18th October 2014

Photo reblogged from A L' Ancien Regime with 713 notes


Portrait of sisters Malvina Ann Louise and Hilda Sophie Charlotte Reventlow in the forest, Detail.
by August Heinrich Schiott (1823-1895)

Portrait of sisters Malvina Ann Louise and Hilda Sophie Charlotte Reventlow in the forest, Detail.

by August Heinrich Schiott (1823-1895)

Tagged: 1850s19th centuryvictorian

Source: sadnessdollart

18th October 2014

Photo reblogged from Fashion Plates and Ephemera! with 17 notes

zeehasablog:

THE ESTRAMADURA.
Fashion plate from Godey’s Lady’s Book, 1864.

zeehasablog:

THE ESTRAMADURA.

Fashion plate from Godey’s Lady’s Book, 1864.

Tagged: 1860s19th centuryvictorian

Source: susannaives.com

18th October 2014

Photo reblogged from Fashion and Costume History with 155 notes

edwardian-time-machine:

Edwardian platinum, seed pearl and diamond pendant-necklace with a removable medallion drop, circa 1900. 
Pictured right is Lily Elsie wearing a similar necklace.
Source

edwardian-time-machine:

Edwardian platinum, seed pearl and diamond pendant-necklace with a removable medallion drop, circa 1900. 

Pictured right is Lily Elsie wearing a similar necklace.

Source

Tagged: 1900s20th century

Source: edwardian-time-machine