What it says on the tin. Also see me at ItMeansApricot, my personal Tumblr, and DressatDownton.

All of the captions in my posts are my own work, unless otherwise noted. So please reblog, don't repost.

29th July 2014

Photoset reblogged from The Edwardian Time Machine with 103 notes

edwardian-time-machine:

I want to say it’s a house coat, but not too sure.

1890

Source

I think it’s an opera cloak-type thing.

Tagged: outerwear

29th July 2014

Photo reblogged from Fashion and Costume History with 60 notes

whenasinsilks:



Bonnet, silk satin lined with silk satin and trimmed with chenille yarn, silk-wrapped millinery wire, silk flowers and silk ribbon, 1805-10, French.

whenasinsilks:

Bonnet, silk satin lined with silk satin and trimmed with chenille yarn, silk-wrapped millinery wire, silk flowers and silk ribbon, 1805-10, French.

Tagged: 1800s19th Centuryregencyheadwear

Source: mfa.org

28th July 2014

Photo reblogged from Turn of the Century with 135 notes

europeanafashion:

Mourning Dress, around 1900 
Foto: Christa Losta
© Wien Museum
Mourning dress symbolized humility and respect for the deceased. Outward signs of mourning were usually observed by women.
They wore deep mourning attire for at least a year after the death of a close relative. Aristoratic widows, like Queen Victoria, or Maria Theresia, in the eighteenth century, wore mourning for the rest of their lives.
Mourning attire had to be of a black and dull fabric. Crêpe was commonly associated with mourning. While men got away with a crêpe band on one sleeve, women were obliged to wear black dresses and hats with heavy crêpe veils. Even accessories such as fans and parasols, had to be black. In the second half of a year of mourning, a women could wear grey or mauve – the first artificially produced colour dye.

Just a couple of things …
Mourning customs are heavily tied to time and place, so it’s tough to generalize about mourning customs as a whole. For example, this is a description of late 18th century French mourning stages and times (from the Galerie des Modes, translated by moi), giving the levels of mourning required for grandparents, parents, spouses, children, cousins, etc., while this 1891 American etiquette book recommends no set periods and even cautions against sinking too deeply into mourning. Another from the 1880s hews closer to the 18th century rules, but notes that levels of affection can and should make a difference.
Men wore more than just an armband for mourning. The armband was handy for men who didn’t own mourning dress or couldn’t afford to buy it when it was needed, but it wasn’t the sole marking. (In fact, some considered it vulgar.) 18th century Frenchmen wore black coats, waistcoats, breeches, and stockings in first mourning, transitioning into greys and white stripes in half/second mourning. Black coats, waistcoats, and trousers were recommended for men by some in the late 19th century. For the most part, men and women mourned for relations for about the same amount of time, though men’s periods of mourning were slightly shorter during the 19th century.
As is popularly understood, women were expected to wear full mourning for at least a year, while widowers’ periods varied from place/time/etiquette writer to place/time/etiquette writer. But during the 19th century some did prescribe equal periods of mourning for both widows and widowers.
Aristocratic women did not generally remain in mourning for the rest of their lives. Widows who chose to stay in black were making a statement about how deeply they felt their loss, and their feeling that they would never love/marry again. Even non-aristocratic women could follow this custom if they felt so inclined.

europeanafashion:

Mourning Dress, around 1900 

Foto: Christa Losta

© Wien Museum

Mourning dress symbolized humility and respect for the deceased. Outward signs of mourning were usually observed by women.

They wore deep mourning attire for at least a year after the death of a close relative. Aristoratic widows, like Queen Victoria, or Maria Theresia, in the eighteenth century, wore mourning for the rest of their lives.

Mourning attire had to be of a black and dull fabric. Crêpe was commonly associated with mourning. While men got away with a crêpe band on one sleeve, women were obliged to wear black dresses and hats with heavy crêpe veils. Even accessories such as fans and parasols, had to be black. In the second half of a year of mourning, a women could wear grey or mauve – the first artificially produced colour dye.

Just a couple of things …

Mourning customs are heavily tied to time and place, so it’s tough to generalize about mourning customs as a whole. For example, this is a description of late 18th century French mourning stages and times (from the Galerie des Modes, translated by moi), giving the levels of mourning required for grandparents, parents, spouses, children, cousins, etc., while this 1891 American etiquette book recommends no set periods and even cautions against sinking too deeply into mourning. Another from the 1880s hews closer to the 18th century rules, but notes that levels of affection can and should make a difference.

Men wore more than just an armband for mourning. The armband was handy for men who didn’t own mourning dress or couldn’t afford to buy it when it was needed, but it wasn’t the sole marking. (In fact, some considered it vulgar.) 18th century Frenchmen wore black coats, waistcoats, breeches, and stockings in first mourning, transitioning into greys and white stripes in half/second mourning. Black coats, waistcoats, and trousers were recommended for men by some in the late 19th century. For the most part, men and women mourned for relations for about the same amount of time, though men’s periods of mourning were slightly shorter during the 19th century.

As is popularly understood, women were expected to wear full mourning for at least a year, while widowers’ periods varied from place/time/etiquette writer to place/time/etiquette writer. But during the 19th century some did prescribe equal periods of mourning for both widows and widowers.

Aristocratic women did not generally remain in mourning for the rest of their lives. Widows who chose to stay in black were making a statement about how deeply they felt their loss, and their feeling that they would never love/marry again. Even non-aristocratic women could follow this custom if they felt so inclined.

Tagged: mourningvictorian19th Century

Source: europeanafashion.eu

27th July 2014

Photo reblogged from We're On Each Other's Team with 184 notes

mudwerks:

(via British Paintings: Phyllis Le Grand by Bassano, 1911)

mudwerks:

(via British Paintings: Phyllis Le Grand by Bassano, 1911)

Tagged: 1910s20th Century

Source: goldenagepaintings.blogspot.com

27th July 2014

Photoset reblogged from Oooh, shiny with 420 notes

omgthatdress:

Afternoon Ensemble

1885-1888

The Metropolitan Museum of Art

(One of my favorites. I date it to the early-mid 1870s because of the height of the waist, but it’s a tricky one.)

Tagged: 1870s1880svictorian19th Century

Source: omgthatdress

24th July 2014

Photoset reblogged from Over the Hills and Far Away with 25 notes

beggars-opera:

Operating out of her New Orleans studio, noted textile conservator Jessica Hack and her assistants are working to restore the wool officer’s coat worn by Lt. Col. William Sutherland Hamilton in the War of 1812. The Louisiana State Museum is conserving the coat for display during the Battle of New Orleans Bicentennial exhibit, “From Dirty Shirts to Buccaneers: The Battle of New Orleans in American Culture,” opening in the Cabildo on Jan. 11, 2015. Lt. Col. Hamilton saw action on the Great Lakes early in the war and possibly in skirmishes around New Orleans in 1815. He settled in Louisiana and became a prominent planter and politician in West Feliciana Parish. When Hamilton’s descendants offered it to Museum in 1923, the coat was in an advanced state of deterioration.” x

Tagged: 19th Century1810smilitarygentlemen

22nd July 2014

Photo reblogged from we love period drama with 116 notes

weloveperioddrama:

We are really happy to announce that this blog has recently reached one thousand followers! We are grateful beyond words to our wonderful period drama lovers, and we wanted to do something special for you, to celebrate this lovely moment. To do so, we have planned this giveway. We hope you’ll enjoy it!
✗ RULES


You must be following this blog (after all, this is meant for our followers.)
Reblog this post to enter the giveway. (Likes don’t count.)
Deadline: you can reblog this post until 23 July, 00:00 (GMT+1).


✗ PRIZES

There’ll be one winner and two runners up that will be picked by a random generator.
The winner will choose what would be our (first) upcoming themed weekend about, S/he could choose from among the themes in this list.
The two runners up will get a gifset/graphic/icon from any period piece they choose.
They will be contacted to know what theme and graphic do they prefer, so make sure you have your askbox open!

That’s pretty much it! You can also find an explanation about what will this themed weekend consist of in the post with the themes. Our askbox is open, so you can send us any question or doubt regarding this giveaway.
We hope you like it, and good luck! ♥

weloveperioddrama:

We are really happy to announce that this blog has recently reached one thousand followers! We are grateful beyond words to our wonderful period drama lovers, and we wanted to do something special for you, to celebrate this lovely moment. To do so, we have planned this giveway. We hope you’ll enjoy it!

✗ RULES
  • You must be following this blog (after all, this is meant for our followers.)
  • Reblog this post to enter the giveway. (Likes don’t count.)
  • Deadline: you can reblog this post until 23 July, 00:00 (GMT+1).
✗ PRIZES
  • There’ll be one winner and two runners up that will be picked by a random generator.
  • The winner will choose what would be our (first) upcoming themed weekend about, S/he could choose from among the themes in this list.
  • The two runners up will get a gifset/graphic/icon from any period piece they choose.
  • They will be contacted to know what theme and graphic do they prefer, so make sure you have your askbox open!

That’s pretty much it! You can also find an explanation about what will this themed weekend consist of in the post with the themes. Our askbox is open, so you can send us any question or doubt regarding this giveaway.

We hope you like it, and good luck! 

22nd July 2014

Photo reblogged from Days Gone By with 8 notes

kittyinva:

Kittyinva: July, 1922 fashion from “The Delineator”.

kittyinva:

Kittyinva: July, 1922 fashion from “The Delineator”.

Tagged: 1920s20th century

22nd July 2014

Photo reblogged from We're On Each Other's Team with 307 notes

philamuseum:

Fashion Friday: Celebrating LanvinHappy 125th anniversary to Lanvin. One of the first fashion houses in Paris, Lanvin remains highly regarded for its superbly crafted and richly ornamented garments. Wedding gowns were a specialty of the house’s founder, Jeanne Lanvin. This 1925 wedding gown was inspired by early fifteenth-century Italian fashions, including bridal headdresses found in the fifteenth-century artist Pisanello’s studies of Northern Italian women. Explore more of our Lanvin holdings here.Wedding Ensemble: Dress, Slip, and Headpiece, 1925, by Jeanne Lanvin

philamuseum:

Fashion Friday: Celebrating Lanvin

Happy 125th anniversary to Lanvin. One of the first fashion houses in Paris, Lanvin remains highly regarded for its superbly crafted and richly ornamented garments. Wedding gowns were a specialty of the house’s founder, Jeanne Lanvin. This 1925 wedding gown was inspired by early fifteenth-century Italian fashions, including bridal headdresses found in the fifteenth-century artist Pisanello’s studies of Northern Italian women. Explore more of our Lanvin holdings here.

Wedding Ensemble: Dress, Slip, and Headpiece, 1925, by Jeanne Lanvin

Tagged: lanvin

Source: philamuseum

19th July 2014

Photo reblogged from Turning the Book Wheel with 126 notes

smithsonianlibraries:

Catalog of patterns for hairwork including rings, bracelets, watch fobs, and of course designs for mourning jewelry.Per the price list in the back, the mourning hair art pictured would be $7.50-$13 including frame. Bargain?
For more hairwork, check out the blog post one of our librarians at the Cooper-Hewitt  wrote.

smithsonianlibraries:

Catalog of patterns for hairwork including rings, bracelets, watch fobs, and of course designs for mourning jewelry.
Per the price list in the back, the mourning hair art pictured would be $7.50-$13 including frame. Bargain?

For more hairwork, check out the blog post one of our librarians at the Cooper-Hewitt  wrote.