What it says on the tin. Also see me at ItMeansApricot, my personal Tumblr, and DressatDownton.

All of the captions in my posts are my own work, unless otherwise noted. So please reblog, don't repost.

19th September 2014

Video reblogged from 1960s: The Times (and Fashion) They Are A' Changin with 27 notes

usnatarchives:

London designers show Fall Fashions in this 1967 Universal News clip. Featured are capes, high collars, and highway-robber outfits, complete with mask and two flint-guns. More practical options include black tunics and long, V-necked white wools for evening. To read more about the fashion in this news reel, visit the Unwritten Record blog.

Tagged: 20th Century1960s

18th September 2014

Post reblogged from We Are Not Amused with 2,025 notes

Studying For Funsies - CARRIAGES

18thcenturylove:

Sooo like a true history peep, I take notes on random bits of historical history. This week, carriages! :D (forgive me if I made a mistake!)

BAROUCHE

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BERLINE

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CABRIOLET

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CALASH (also name for folding top on BAROUCHE, CHAISE and VICTORIA)

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CHAISE (CHAY, SHAY)

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CURRICLE (TYPE OF CHAISE)

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COUPE

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No roof for driver = COUPE DE-VILLE
Coupé de-ville with folding top = LANDAU
Coupé de-ville with folding top over passenger =LANDAULET

DILIGENCE

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HANSOM (BASED ON CABRIOLET, A TYPE OF “FLY”)

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- "Fly" = A cab (short for cabriolet) for hire, hansom replaced hackney
- A hackney of a more expensive or high class was called a REMISE

OMNIBUS

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PHAETON

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VICTORIA (PHAETON BUT CLASSIER)

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Tagged: victoriancarriagesi always thought a phaeton was a variation on the curricle though

Source: 18thcenturylove

18th September 2014

Question with 4 notes

khaleesa said: Really enjoyed your Wives and Daughters costume posts. Could you talk more about the coiffure à la Titus? I wondered about that hairstyle in the movie and would love to learn more!

Sure!

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Fashion plates aren’t a totally reliable indicator of what’s popular in ordinary dress, but overall I think the Titus (just called “cropt hair” in English) was fairly common in France during the early part of the long Regency, and probably more fashionable than common in England and the US. It seems that women with the style made use of switches and fake curls - sometimes wire wrapped with silk or hair - in order to create fancier hairstyles.

There were a few variations. Broadly speaking, the Titus was first straight, like Lady Harriet’s, but then developed a kind of teased crest on top of the head, and then was more commonly curled or tousled overall. 

Tagged: regency1800shairstyle19th Century

18th September 2014

Post

vintagevision said: Don’t you think that coat and hat is totally Edwardian?

Not exactly. The way it’s shot, the coat looks like a baggy duster - although maybe there is a good shot of it and Desert Sky didn’t take a cap of it - but in its second picture it looks like it has a waistline. The lapels are a little masculine-styled for the era, compared to what I see in fashion plates, but the overall idea and shape are good.

The hat is also styled more Edwardian by being set to one side, but that could be misunderstanding of fashion plates - fashionable hats sat squarely on the back of the head, but were made asymmetrically to look slanted. The trim is a little understated, though, and the crown should be higher.

Tagged: wives & daughters

17th September 2014

Post with 1 note

thecorsetauthority said: you can use any from Scarlet Empress on facebook (that’s me) so long as it’s credited back

Thank you so much! I’ve added two in so that it’s not just a page of bland text.

Tagged: thecorsetauthority

17th September 2014

Photoset with 3 notes

So that dress for the wedding was sort of crazy, but the rest of Harriet’s dresses are pretty great. The only thing I take issue with is her hairstyle.

The coiffure à la Titus was a very fashionable style that is WAY underrepresented in films … set in the first decade in the 19th century and early Regency. By the end of the 1820s, it would have been very unseemly. It works characterization-wise to show that she’s unconventional and different than everyone else, but it’s far too behind the times for someone as stylish as Lady Harriet.

Tagged: 1820sfilm costumewives & daughters

17th September 2014

Photoset with 2 notes

Some more of the three-way contrast. Hyacinth is totally accurate in her OTT splendor; apart from the hair and waistline, Cynthia is strangely more like 1805, but anyway, she’s way toned down compared to her mother; Molly is stuck in the early 1820s, and is in a pure white (which causes even more of a contrast with Hyacinth’s fussy white).

Tagged: 1820sfilm costumewives & daughters

17th September 2014

Photoset with 6 notes

Cynthia and Molly’s costuming is like Hyacinth vs. Molly, but way softer. Like her mother, Cynthia is more fashionable than Molly - however, instead of looking frivolous, she looks adorable. Her flowers are lush, her dresses are flattering colors. Her hair is 100% perfect for the period.

(In the last pair, Molly’s neckline is actually way more fashionable than Cynthia’s. In the 1820s, it was all about the width.)

Tagged: 1820sfilm costumewives & daughters

17th September 2014

Photo with 3 notes

Transition complete. Hyacinth has huuuge silk sleeves and a great big pelerine, so long it tucks into her belt! While Molly is in a plain checked morning dress with a little white neckline ruffle.
Personally, I think the whole thing is a bit heavy-handed. I get it, Molly doesn’t care about fashion and that’s wonderful, while Hyacinth cares too much about fashion and she’s ridiculous. But everyone looked ridiculous from about 1825 to 1835. Not just people who were following fashion too hard - people who were just looking normal as they saw it.

Transition complete. Hyacinth has huuuge silk sleeves and a great big pelerine, so long it tucks into her belt! While Molly is in a plain checked morning dress with a little white neckline ruffle.

Personally, I think the whole thing is a bit heavy-handed. I get it, Molly doesn’t care about fashion and that’s wonderful, while Hyacinth cares too much about fashion and she’s ridiculous. But everyone looked ridiculous from about 1825 to 1835. Not just people who were following fashion too hard - people who were just looking normal as they saw it.

Tagged: 1820sfilm costumewives & daughters

17th September 2014

Photoset with 1 note

The screencap at the top highlights the relationship Molly and her stepmother have through the entire plot. Molly is simple, a little behind fashion, but classically lovely; Hyacinth is fussy and overcomplicated. Before the wedding, she dresses in a fussy and overcomplicated way that’s more than a few years out of date, but from the wedding itself she is totally there. (I had initially thought that her clothing was pushed a few years ahead to get the best contrast with her huge sleeves and Molly’s moderate ones, but with further research I realized that nope, those big sleeves were already in by 1827.) (Molly’s bonnet does look more 1840s to me, though.)

Lady Harriet’s dress is just weird. I’m pretty sure she’s supposed to be wildly fashionable and rich, but she’s here dressed in a kind of ca. 1810 fantasy-ish weird pleated dress. I do not understand it.

Tagged: 1820sfilm costumewives & daughters